Archive for the ‘Law and Resources’ Category

posted by miku on Apr 20

Check out these legal law help images:

32d – Marshall-Kline Residence – 2037 S Harvard Blvd – HCM-961
legal law help

Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

- Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

32 – J B Marshall & Fred H Kline Residence. 2037 S Harvard Blvd. 1903. Oliver Dennis & Lyman Farwell.

Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument No. 961.

The J B Marshall Residence is one of the most ornate and beautiful surviving mansions on Harvard Boulevard. The house was designed by architecture team of Dennis and Farwell in the Florentine and Prairie Style. Farwell studied architecture abroad in Europe and Asia and interned in New York for McKim, Mead and White, before coming to Los Angeles. Farwell’s training shows beautifully in this house. J B Marshall didn’t live in the house long. On May 31, 1907, the Los Angeles Herald announced that J B Marshall had sold the house to Fred H Kline, through the Althouse Bros. for ,000. Kline was a well known mining operator from Goldfield, NV. Kline didn’t stay long either. By 1910, however, the house is owned by Thomas & Annie N Vigus. Like many of Los Angeles residents of the early 20th Century, Thomas Vigus had his hand in many enterprises. He was the president and general manager of the LA Storage Com & Lumber Company, general manager of the American-Pacific Construction Company, the secretary for the Los Alamos Petroleum Company, secretary for the Pacific Tile & Terre Cotta Company, and was heavily involved in real estate.

38a – Fairchild Residence – 2090 S Harvard Blvd
legal law help

Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

- Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

38 – J A Fairchild Residence. 2090 S Harvard Blvd. 1910. Myron H M Hunt and Elmer Grey, with a 1911 garage by Elmer Grey, the addition of a 1915 library by Robert D Farquhar, and a 1928 remodel of the library and the addition of a bedroom by Robert D Farquhar.

Talk about a house with an architectural pedigree! Three of Los Angeles’s most prominent architects had their hand in creating this beautifully designed Colonial Revival mansion. Not much is known about the Fairchild family, except that James (Jas) A Fairchild came to California in the late 1800’s and made his fortune in asphalt, paving the early city dirt streets. By the end of the century, it was a boarding house, with many alterations. The current owner has restored the house, bringing it back to its former beauty. A service stairway in the back of the house, which had been sealed off, was re-discovered and opened during the renovations. The 1911 garage designed by Elmer Grey contains a large chauffer’s quarters above. The 1915/1928 Farquhar library addition had been dry-walled over at some point and has been uncovered and beautiful wood-work restored.

posted by miku on Apr 19

Question by texaslibsticker: I’m a little confused about the Arizona law…?
Isn’t the state basically saying they’re just going to enforce the already existing federals immigration laws, but only at a state level? And, hasn’t the federal government made it perfectly clear that they don’t have time to properly address the illegal alien issue, due to their desire to nationalize certain industries and struggle to find new inventive taxes?
Karma, the law doesn’t allow stopping just because of suspicious behavoir, it allows a state official to ask for documentation. The vehicle laws allow plenty of reason to pull over someone, which is one of the reasons for the seat belt laws (lap belts were outlawed because police can’t see them). If we can use a state law to help enforce a federal law, isn’t that a good thing?
If the federal government isn’t enforcing the law, and the citizens are endangered, doesn’t it make sense that the state step up and protect the law abiding citizens?

Doesn’t the US civil rights laws apply only to US citizens? Can I expect my US civil rights if I’m arrested in Mexico? Venezuela? El Salvadore? Yeah, not so much.
Jet, all citizens in the great State of Texas must carry some form of identification. If they want to cash a paycheck, if the want to open a bank account, if they want to drive a car… they have to have an ID or license. Why is so bad to make someone that barely speaks English, has trouble driving according to state law, or any number of other clues; why is so bad to ask for an ID?

Best answer:

Answer by GOZ2FAST
You got it…thank you for telling the truth which most on here refuse to do…they just read the progressive marxist lies and repeat them.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

posted by miku on Apr 19

Question by Tiger Eyes: Which one of these majors would help me go in the direction of being legal secretary?
Pre-major Business Education/Marketing Education
Pre-major Criminal Justice
Pre-major English
Pre-major History
Pre-major Social Science Secondary Education

The reason I am asking is because my college that’s nearby me offers these and I really want to go in the direction of being a legal secretary and I’m really confused and frustrated about what to major in. I’m taking these courses online and it’s for an associates degree.

Any help is appreciated.

Best answer:

Answer by Obama is a loser
Print this article

Become a Legal Secretary
A legal secretary is responsible for most of the clerical duties in a law firm. When you become a legal secretary you will be spending a lot of time answering phone calls and emails, preparing court papers, typing and filing documents, maintaining a law library, fielding questions from clients and scheduling appointments. There are job opportunities available in private law firms, government agencies, insurance companies and financial institutions. Read on to learn more.

Difficulty: Moderately Easy
Instructions

Things You’ll Need
High school diploma or GED
Certification

Become a Legal Secretary

1
Get a high school diploma or a GED. You don’t need a college degree to become a legal secretary; but acquiring secretarial skills and taking courses in business-related subjects when you are in high school will help put you on the right career path.

2
Bone up on your secretarial skills. Perhaps you are considering embarking on a second career or going back to work after your children are grown. Since legal secretaries spend a good part of their day typing letters and legal documents, word processing and keyboarding skills are a must. Take some classes at your local community college.

3
Familiarize yourself with legal documents. The public library is a good place to start. Once you begin working, you will learn as you go, but knowing the difference between a subpoena and an appeal will give you a heads up during your initial job interview.

4
Brush up on your “people” skills. Legal secretaries spend a lot of time dealing with high-powered attorneys and their demanding clients. You must be able to communicate effectively.

5
Obtain certification. Although certification is not necessarily a prerequisite for you to become a legal secretary, the profession is highly competitive and many big law firms require it, especially if you want to advance. Legal secretaries working for less than three years can become Accredited Legal Secretaries (ALS) and those working for more than three years can be certified as Professional Legal Secretaries (PLS). For more information, contact the National Association of Legal Secretaries (see Resources below).

6
Get a “temp” job. Many temporary jobs in this field obtained through an employment agency lead to full-time work. A temporary position will give both you and the employer an opportunity to try each other out.

Read more: How to Become a Legal Secretary | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2068958_become-legal-secretary.html#ixzz1Y3pwJjer

Give your answer to this question below!

posted by miku on Apr 18

Question by momma_wolf1986: Looking for laws on wolf-dog hybrid ownership in Michigan?
My hubby and I have been looking at getting a wolf-dog hybrid, but we can’t find any info on ownership requirements or if it is even legal to own one in the state of Michigan. We have both owned wolf-dogs in the past, but we do not want to risk having a wolf-dog if it is against the law. Any information would be helpful.
For those of you who think that it is wrong for these beautiful creature to find a “forever home” you need to understand 2 things…
1. We are people who can provide proper housing for these creatures in a proper setting where they can be happy.
2. Having owned 3 of these in my life I know what to expect and how to handle it WITH OUT PUTTING THEM DOWN!
I am planning to open a rescue for Wolf-Dogs in the next 2 to 4 years pending proper approvals.

Best answer:

Answer by yukidomari
It’s against the law in michigan.

MICHIGAN

“Wild wolves in Michigan are protected under the federal Endangered Species Act and under the State’s Natural Resources and Enviromental Protection Act, Part 365. Thus, they cannot be “taken” or possessed in the state.
Possession, importation or breeding of wolf-dog crosses is prohibited in the state. Any wolf-dog crosses existing prior to the effective date of this regulation require an annual permit, sterilization, permanent implanted identification and rigid containment and transportation facilities. Owners must also post specific warning signs informing people of the presence of a dangerous wolf-dog. Permitting and prosecution is to be handled by the local jurisdiction in which the animal is located. “

Give your answer to this question below!

posted by miku on Apr 17

http://www.legalbistro.com Retain top guardianship attorney Schertz Texas. If you are looking to find an attorney in Schertz, Texas to handle your guardiansh…
Video Rating: 0 / 5

posted by miku on Apr 16

Question by : what are some careers involving law?
im definitely researching this a little late…I graduate in about 2 weeks and plan on doing post secondary soon. but what would be a good job that involves law, being a cop doesn’t really interest meand a lawyer kind of does but i’m not sure if i have what it takes.

If it makes a difference I’ve never been that great with math ( ive completed math 11 and I’m in math 12 but probably won’t pass) but I do pretty good in english.

Best answer:

Answer by Aj
im in the exact same position as you. I failed Gr.11 functions though. Im going to do U/C mixed math though then Gr.12 data management. Sadly most careers/degrees involving law/ social sciences dont make good money. Ive been doing research for a year now. Some good degrees related to law are Political Science,Criminology, Criminal Justice, Legal studies, Social Work,Public policy, etc. But the thing is it will be harder for you to find a job as all these are BA degrees. With them you can work in gov’t., social work, non-governmental organziations, airports, in security etc. There are a lot of options but you will have to find them. They’re not job specific degrees like accounting, engineering, etc. One good option i plan on doing is a major in Human resources. Every company has a HR department and theyre always hiring. HR deals with employing people, developing their capacities, utilizing, maintaining and compensating their services in tune with the job and organizational requirement. HR deals with employment law and HR law, who you can recruit, what questions to ask in an interview, etc. It is a business degree strongly related to law and uses close to no math. After getting a 4 year degree in HR you may wish to go to law school, find work, do an MBA, etc. You may wish to use your degree to work in other places related to law. It’s up to you.

Give your answer to this question below!

posted by miku on Apr 16

What is the biggest problem for animals under the law? Stephen Wells, ALDF’s executive director answers the question in our first installment of 30 Second An…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

posted by miku on Apr 15

Question by cgiv76: IF you have a Drs order for weed it is legal by law to arrest the person?
Say you are sitting on a bus bench alone can the police arrest you for smoking weed even though a DR ordered it. It is legal by state law. Would the police arrest you anyway dispite having poof you have Dr’s orders and the state say’s medical weed is legal ?

Best answer:

Answer by rukidding
It’s still illegal.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

posted by miku on Apr 14

Some cool legal law help images:

28a – Scott Residence – 1910 S Harvard Blvd – HCM-963
legal law help

Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

- Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

28 – Linda Scott Residence. 1910 S Harvard Blvd. 1907. Frank M Tyler .

Los Angeles Historic Cultural monument No. 963.

Departing from his usual Transitional Victorian-Craftsman Style, F M Tyler designed a mansion for Ms. Linda Scott with a Moorish façade, in 1910. The rooms of this house are arranged around a central foyer with a center staircase descending in the middle of the room from an open gallery. On the south are a feminine parlor and library; on the north is a masculine study and opulent dining room. Access to the service area is from a door hidden behind the staircase. The arrangement is meant to impress, and it does!

16b – Morgan-Probasco Residence – 2077 S Hobart Blvd
legal law help

Image by Kansas Sebastian
West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

- Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

16 – Alfred W & Janet W Morgan and Robert P & Dr Harriet Gephart Probasco Residence. 2077 S Hobart Blvd. 1903.

The Morgan residence is an anomaly in the neighborhood. It doesn’t quite fit in. The shape, style construct of the house could be 1903 if it was in any other less-tony neighborhood, but in West Adams Heights it looks out of place and downright old fashioned. The tall transitional Victorian/Craftsman façade, tall narrow windows, double front gables, shiplap siding, and entrance situation on the side suggest it’s an older house, about 1895-1900. It’s not impossible it was built in 1903, but it’s also just as likely it was a preexisting structure moved to the site. Without the original permits, it’s nearly impossible to know. A W Morgan was controller for the Conservative Life Company and in 1906 was appointed the secretary and treasurer. The same year the family moved to the other end of the West Adams Heights, to 1910 W 25th Street, where they commissioned a very stately hillside Tudor mansion across from the Frederick H Rindge Estate. Robert P and Dr Harriet Gephart Probasco then took over the property. The 1910 census lists Robert as a merchant and investor, and his wife is listed as a Doctor/Physical Director Collegiate School. She graduated medical school in 1902, probably at the University of Chicago, and was at different times in charge of examining women at the Los Angeles City Jail, head of the Juvenile Hall Hospital, and later in 1918 was appointed to be the head of the Los Feliz Hospital, a correction and detention place for women. They lived at the property with their in-laws, Harry and Mae Gephart.

posted by miku on Apr 14

Question by : POLL: Should Marijuana be Legal?
1.Medicinal use: Marijuana can be used as medicine because it helps to stimulate apetite and relieve nausea in cancer and AIDS patients.

2.Hemp: The hemp plant is a valuable natural resource. Legalizing marijuana would eliminate the confusion surrounding hemp and allow us to take advantage of hemp’s agricultural and industrial uses.

3.Religious Use:Some religions instruct their followers to use marijuana. Just like Christianity and Judaism instruct their followers to drink wine on certain occaisions, some Hindus, Buddhists, Rastafarians, and members of other religions use marijuana as part of their spiritual and religious ceremonies. These people deserve the freedom to practice their religion as they see fit. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution says that the government cannot ‘prohibit the free exercise’ of religion, and so marijuana should be legal.

Would you tell God its illegal?-Bob Marley
Steve,what are the Negatives?There are none.The Negative of Marijuana are made by the government or people who choose sides with the Governmet in order to scare other people into thinking it is a bad drug,did i use the word drug?Well obviously its NOT A DRUG,its a plant,GOD MADE IT.Human made drug,god made plant.

Best answer:

Answer by Steve
why do you only list the positive things about this?

edit: trying to say there are no negatives to this is being arrogant and ignorant. if there were no negatives, then there would be no controversy to the whole situation. aside from having no proof that the government makes those fake ‘negative’ claims about marijuana to scare the public (other than ur brainwashed assumption), how often would the plant be abused by the public?

regardless, i can just as easily find an article off the internet (which im sure you have for your points here) and show the negatives of marijuana, and why it shouldnt be legalized

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!