Archive for April, 2013

posted by shelly on Apr 30

Question by mistercliff2002: What are the international laws regarding business phone call hours?
In the United States it’s only legal for businesses to place phone calls within certain hours. I am trying to find out if this is true internationally, and if so, find a list of appropriate hours per country. I never thought this would be such a challenge to find and would appreciate your help!

Best answer:

Answer by Shane
People out of country can call whenever, we cant really stop them. And if there was a law they probably won’t follow it.

What do you think? Answer below!

posted by shelly on Apr 30

Check out these criminal defense lawyers images:

Kevin Napper
criminal defense lawyers

Image by Kevin Napper
Kevin Napper is a Tampa lawyer focused on white collar criminal defense.

Kevin Napper
criminal defense lawyers

Image by Kevin Napper
Kevin Napper is a Tampa lawyer focused on white collar criminal defense.

posted by shelly on Apr 30

A few nice legal forms images I found:

Jefferson Memorial – tidal basin 03 – 2012-03-15
legal forms

Image by dctim1
Looking south-southwest at the Jefferson Memorial on the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., on March 15, 2012.

The memorial is located in West Potomac Park. This area of land (which, along with East Potomac Park, enclosed the Tidal Basin) was created between 1881 and 1911 by soil dredged from the bottom of the Potomac River. As the park was nearing completion, the U.S. Senate Park Improvement Commission (informally known as the McMillan Commission, after its chairman, Senator James McMillan) drew up a plan for the completion of Pierre L’Enfant’s vision for the central core of Washington, D.C. This report, best known as the "McMillan Plan," proposed placing a major Neoclassical memorial due south of the Washington Monument in the new park.

In the early 1920s, a memorial to Theodore Roosevelt was proposed for the area, and a design competition held. But no memorial was built.

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed building a memorial to Thomas Jefferson as part of the Federal Triangle complex of federal office buildings. Although no memorial was built, Rep. John Boylan sponsored legislation in Congress to form a Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission. Congress approved the bill and appropriated million for a memorial. Boylan chaired it. The memorial commission declined to sponsor a design competition. Instead, it asked architect John Russell Pope — who had imposed a Neoclassical design on Federal Triangle, designed the National Archives Building, designed the National Gallery of Art, and designed the Freemasons’ "House of the Temple" in D.C. — to submit a design.

At the time, no location for the Jefferson memorial had been chosen. The memorial commission was considering four sites: At Buzzard Point, at the south end of East Capitol Street; in Lincoln Park at 12th and East Capitol Streets NE; on the south side of the National Mall at the current site of the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum; and in West Potomac Park. The memorial commission chose the Tidal Basin due to its prominence and because it had been chosen in the McMillan Plan as a means of completeing L’Enfant’s vision.

Pope submitted a different design for each site. His design for the Tidal Basin site consisted of a central, square structure with columns in front and back, with a free-standing statue of Jefferson and a long, rectangular, north-south running reflecting pool in front. Extending right and left were colonnades, and additional colonnades ran north from these extensions halfway along the reflecting pool. The memorial was intended to stand on a 25-foot high concrete dais. The memorial itself was about 145 feet high and 220 feet wide, and based on the Parthenon in Rome.

Pope’s design came under significant criticsm for being monumentally fascist, and a more conservative design requested. Pope’s new design was based on the Villa La Rotonda in Vicenza, Italy (which Jefferson had admired). Pope also revised his original design, dropping the height to just 135 feet and the width to just 165 feet.

In 1937, the memorial commission submitted its designs to the National Capital Planning Commission and the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, both of which had legal authority to approve the design of the memorial. Both of Pope’s designs were widely derided, and scathing criticism came from all quarters. The House of Representatives was so incensed that it began holding hearings on the lack of design competition. Pope died of stomach cancer on August 27, 1937.

A month after Pope’s death, his assistants — Daniel Higgins and Otto Eggers — met with the Commission of Fine Arts. They agreed to move the memorial 600 feet south, so that it wouldn’t stand directly on the banks of the Tidal Basin. They also agreed to abandon Pope’s two designs and use Pope’s unbuilt Theodore Roosevelt memorial design as a starting point.

But Sadie Pope, Russell’s widow and heir to his copyrights on all these designs, was incensed. She began a letter-writing campaign that caught the attention of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Roosevelt intervened in the design controversy, and proposed a smaller, more intimate memorial that incorporated elements of the Pantheon and the Villa La Rotonda.

In June 1938, Congress restored funding for the memorial. The Commission of Fine Arts never approved a plan for the memorial, but by this time the controversy was over and construction was proceeding. Ground was broken in December 1938 and President Roosevelt dedicated it on Jefferson’s birthday on April 13, 1943.

Determined to avoid another design controversy, the memorial commission held a competition for the Jefferson statue in 1939. More than 100 submissions were made, and six finalists chosen. Rudulph Evans was selected as the design winner. Stonecarver Adolph Weinman was selected to sculpt the pediment above the entrance.

Evans’ statue was not ready by the time the memorial was dedicated. World War II broke out in December 1941, and bronze was no longer legally available for use in art projects (it all had to be diverted to the war effort). So a plaster version was installed and painted to look like bronze. The finished bronze statue was installed in 1947.

Jefferson Memorial – SE corner – 2012-03-15
legal forms

Image by dctim1
Looking northwest at the southeast corner of the Jefferson Memorial on the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., on March 15, 2012.

The memorial is located in West Potomac Park. This area of land (which, along with East Potomac Park, enclosed the Tidal Basin) was created between 1881 and 1911 by soil dredged from the bottom of the Potomac River. As the park was nearing completion, the U.S. Senate Park Improvement Commission (informally known as the McMillan Commission, after its chairman, Senator James McMillan) drew up a plan for the completion of Pierre L’Enfant’s vision for the central core of Washington, D.C. This report, best known as the "McMillan Plan," proposed placing a major Neoclassical memorial due south of the Washington Monument in the new park.

In the early 1920s, a memorial to Theodore Roosevelt was proposed for the area, and a design competition held. But no memorial was built.

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed building a memorial to Thomas Jefferson as part of the Federal Triangle complex of federal office buildings. Although no memorial was built, Rep. John Boylan sponsored legislation in Congress to form a Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission. Congress approved the bill and appropriated million for a memorial. Boylan chaired it. The memorial commission declined to sponsor a design competition. Instead, it asked architect John Russell Pope — who had imposed a Neoclassical design on Federal Triangle, designed the National Archives Building, designed the National Gallery of Art, and designed the Freemasons’ "House of the Temple" in D.C. — to submit a design.

At the time, no location for the Jefferson memorial had been chosen. The memorial commission was considering four sites: At Buzzard Point, at the south end of East Capitol Street; in Lincoln Park at 12th and East Capitol Streets NE; on the south side of the National Mall at the current site of the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum; and in West Potomac Park. The memorial commission chose the Tidal Basin due to its prominence and because it had been chosen in the McMillan Plan as a means of completeing L’Enfant’s vision.

Pope submitted a different design for each site. His design for the Tidal Basin site consisted of a central, square structure with columns in front and back, with a free-standing statue of Jefferson and a long, rectangular, north-south running reflecting pool in front. Extending right and left were colonnades, and additional colonnades ran north from these extensions halfway along the reflecting pool. The memorial was intended to stand on a 25-foot high concrete dais. The memorial itself was about 145 feet high and 220 feet wide, and based on the Parthenon in Rome.

Pope’s design came under significant criticsm for being monumentally fascist, and a more conservative design requested. Pope’s new design was based on the Villa La Rotonda in Vicenza, Italy (which Jefferson had admired). Pope also revised his original design, dropping the height to just 135 feet and the width to just 165 feet.

In 1937, the memorial commission submitted its designs to the National Capital Planning Commission and the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, both of which had legal authority to approve the design of the memorial. Both of Pope’s designs were widely derided, and scathing criticism came from all quarters. The House of Representatives was so incensed that it began holding hearings on the lack of design competition. Pope died of stomach cancer on August 27, 1937.

A month after Pope’s death, his assistants — Daniel Higgins and Otto Eggers — met with the Commission of Fine Arts. They agreed to move the memorial 600 feet south, so that it wouldn’t stand directly on the banks of the Tidal Basin. They also agreed to abandon Pope’s two designs and use Pope’s unbuilt Theodore Roosevelt memorial design as a starting point.

But Sadie Pope, Russell’s widow and heir to his copyrights on all these designs, was incensed. She began a letter-writing campaign that caught the attention of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Roosevelt intervened in the design controversy, and proposed a smaller, more intimate memorial that incorporated elements of the Pantheon and the Villa La Rotonda.

In June 1938, Congress restored funding for the memorial. The Commission of Fine Arts never approved a plan for the memorial, but by this time the controversy was over and construction was proceeding. Ground was broken in December 1938 and President Roosevelt dedicated it on Jefferson’s birthday on April 13, 1943.

Determined to avoid another design controversy, the memorial commission held a competition for the Jefferson statue in 1939. More than 100 submissions were made, and six finalists chosen. Rudulph Evans was selected as the design winner. Stonecarver Adolph Weinman was selected to sculpt the pediment above the entrance.

Evans’ statue was not ready by the time the memorial was dedicated. World War II broke out in December 1941, and bronze was no longer legally available for use in art projects (it all had to be diverted to the war effort). So a plaster version was installed and painted to look like bronze. The finished bronze statue was installed in 1947.

Alter Nature: We Can – Makoto Azuma – Shiki1 (2010)
legal forms

Image by Z33 art centre, Hasselt
Shiki 1 shows a bonsai pine tree in a metal frame. Bonsai cultivation is one of the oldest forms of conscious manipulation of nature for aesthetic reasons. Via low-tech techniques such as branch pruning, root pruning, and guided growth of stems and trunks, a tree is reduced to an elegant plant. The metal frame in which the bonsai is placed, refers to the (legal) context within which manipulations of nature occur, and/or nature is placed.
Makoto Azuma
Shiki 1 2010
Courtesy Makoto Azuma

photo: Kristof Vrancken / Z33

posted by shelly on Apr 29

Question by Dr h2o: If someone adopts a child and the child isn’t what was expected, can the parents return it for a different one?
sort of like a lemon law thingy.

I’m not looking to adopt, i know many women that wouldn’t mind letting me impregnate them or something.

Best answer:

Answer by NGM_KID
it has to be of equal or lesser value…..

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

posted by shelly on Apr 29

Question by Cesca [breatheeme]: As a teenaged intern, how can I make a good impression at a law firm?
This summer I’ll be interning at a well known law firm in New York. Not only am I nervous, but as aspiring lawyer in the future (I’m in my mid teens now) I’m incredibly excited.

However, I’m not sure what I am supposed to expect, or how I can impress these lawyers, as I’ve never been in this kind of environment, or worked before.

Thanks so much for any advice!

Best answer:

Answer by Steve
IT IS CALLED: BROWN NOSING OR KISSING ASS

What do you think? Answer below!

posted by shelly on Apr 29

A few nice criminal defense lawyers images I found:

Kevin Napper
criminal defense lawyers

Image by Kevin Napper
Kevin Napper is a Tampa lawyer focused on white collar criminal defense.

Kevin Napper
criminal defense lawyers

Image by Kevin Napper
Kevin Napper is a Tampa lawyer focused on white collar criminal defense.

posted by shelly on Apr 28

Question by uponit7771: What is a legal form of announcement for a company to send in regards to abitration agreements?
Late 2006 my company said it made an “announcement” about an opt out arbitration agreement. I’ve asked everyone and their mother about what they heard and they have said they’ve heard nothing about and abitration “announcement” that everyone is bound to.

Is there “announcement” legal? They said last year if we didn’t opt out then we agree to arbitrate. That’s crazy, how in the hell were we supposed to know if it?

Thank you in advance for your help

Best answer:

Answer by Melli
This is usually done via mass mailing and a posting in the three largest newspapers in the relevant region. Check the internet and the proper newspapers for the articles.

Give your answer to this question below!

posted by shelly on Apr 28

Question by ohsonowisee: How long should we wait for the law firm to contact us?
My daughter was paralyzed as a result of j pouch surgery and we contacted a law firm in July 2008 and signed a retainer and we have not heard from them as to whether they will take on the case or not. They received the medical records in December and we are still waiting to hear something. Is this normal practice, or should we contact another law firm? I’m tired of having to call them to find out what’s going on.

Best answer:

Answer by Jack P
That’s a very long time with no communication. I would retain someone else to take the case.

What do you think? Answer below!

posted by shelly on Apr 28

personal injury lawyers
by dbking

Question by elledriver80: Is a transactional lawyer a type of lawyer or not?
what is a transactional lawyer? is that a classification of lawyer like a personal injury or criminal defense laywer? what exactly does a transactional do on a daily basis? Is this a lucrative field in law as compared to the other forms of practice? TY.

Best answer:

Answer by raichasays
A transactional lawyer is a (real) lawyer who puts business transactions, or “deals”, together.

They can do very well.

Add your own answer in the comments!

posted by shelly on Apr 28

A few nice law firms images I found:

IMG_1305.JPG
law firms

Image by kostia
"McCoury, Fleck, and McCoury: A law firm it ain’t." Béla Fleck, Ronnie McCoury, Rob McCoury.

IMG_1295.JPG
law firms

Image by kostia
"McCoury, Fleck, and McCoury: A law firm it ain’t." Béla Fleck, Ronnie McCoury, Rob McCoury.

IMG_1296.JPG
law firms

Image by kostia
"McCoury, Fleck, and McCoury: A law firm it ain’t." Béla Fleck, Ronnie McCoury, Rob McCoury.