Archive for June, 2013

posted by shelly on Jun 30

Question by Rocky: Shall I start with legal writing as a legal translator?
I wasn’t a law major at school but I need to translate legal documents for my boss now. Is it a good idea to study legal writing as a start and at the same time learn about laws?
Looking forward to your suggestions. thx!

Best answer:

Answer by mailaccount63
No. Don’t invest any of your time and/or money into Law.

Please be aware of what you are proposing on getting yourself into. Please do more research first.

>>>>>Reminder: We are in a World-wide Recession.

Warning> Jobs in the field of Law are drying up fast!! This is just not a good field to invest time and/or money into. This is a SHRINKING, crumbling, and dying vocational field. Many reasons. Many people today (mistakenly) think they can do their own legal work, thanks to the Internet. Also, we simply already have way too many Legal Professionals – we have an absolute glut!! (“Legal Professionals” includes, but is not limited to: Attorneys/Lawyers, Paralegals, Legal Assistants, Legal Secretaries, Bailiffs, Court Reporters, etc, etc)

Employers (usually law firms) in the field of Law today want employees with degrees from traditional colleges/universities. Those “certificates” you see advertised aren’t worth the paper they are printed on – they are generally scams. (I found this out the hard way.)

Regarding law school: Be prepared to take on a lot of debt.

Even if you finish law school, you won’t be able to find a job when you are done. Since this vocational field is shrinking, many new attorneys/lawyers are, themselves, having to work “down” as Paralegals, Legal Assistants, Legal Secretaries, Bailiffs, Court Reporters, etc, etc, to simply try to keep some of their bills paid < that the job market/economy is just saturated with way too many Legal Professionals. Instead the schools will feed you a fairytale and will lie to you. The root of the problem is we have too many law schools. We are in a recession, and the schools are fighting for their own survival – they will tell students anything to get to the students’ money. (Which is why they won’t tell you the truth about the job market for the field of Law.) And these schools continue to recruit and churn out even more graduates………….

If you don’t believe me, then just do a search here on Yahoo Answers to see what other posters are saying about the current status of the field of Law. Call some local law firms – ask to speak to the Manager of Human Resources – ask them if they are hiring; ask them what they think about job availability in the field of Law………………

In the book “So You Want to be a Lawyer?” by Marianne Calabrese and Susanne Calabrese (ISBN 0-88391-136-1): “The United States has more lawyers than any other country in the world. About 38,000 students graduate >each year< from the 200+ law schools in the United States. The competition is very keen for jobs and clients." - Even Associate Justice Antonin Scalia (who served on the U.s. Supreme Court for more than 20 years) says there are too many lawyers. (9/14/2008) Check out these websites: http://informeddecisionmaking.blogspot.com http://calicocat.com/2004/08/law-school-big-lie.html http://abajournal.com/news/triplt_bad_news_for_law_students_three_firms_aX_summer_associate_programs/ http://abajournal.com/news/as_rio_tinto_saves_millions_other_corps_will_outsource_too_counsel_says/ http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2009/02/03/dont-try-to-dodge-the-recession-with-grad-school/ (A link to a website does not constitute endorsement.) If you want a job when you are done with your studies, consider and look into the fields of >>>Healthcare or Information Technology! I spoke to a career counselor from Jobs and Family Services, and HE told me that these are where the jobs are, and future job availability! and scholarships!

Good luck.

(This is based on my current knowledge, information, belief, and life experiences. This was intended as personal opinion, and not intended to be used as legal advice. Please be careful and do your research.)

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

posted by shelly on Jun 30

Question by : a detective called me and wants to question me! where can i find a free criminal defense lawyer?
a detective called me today and wants to question me and im not sure why? should i get a lawyer before i talk to him? and if so i need to know where i can find a criminal defense lawyer for free or pro bono

Best answer:

Answer by Bugglby
hhmmm, you’re wise to start with yahoo answers,

What do you think? Answer below!

posted by shelly on Jun 30

Question by serendipitous_333: What is the best book with which to learn legal research and writing?
I know there are a ton of books out there, but I’m not sure how to choose one. I have a few years experience in litigation case management for a mortgage company but no formal legal education (no paralegal or law courses). I may be seeking a job as a litigation paralegal or clerk, so please keep that in mind with your suggestions. Thanks!

Best answer:

Answer by Shibi
In many jurisdictions, you will have to be certified as a paralegal. In California, this involves doing the 2-year program and passing the exam, or just taking the exam, or by obtaining some written attestation to your proficiency by a licensed attorney (or two, I cannot remember). The CA Association of Legal Support Professionals could probably tell you what book(s) would be best. They are here:

What do you think? Answer below!

posted by shelly on Jun 30

http://www.fitzgeraldimmigration.com. 617.523.6320. Meet immigration and criminal defense lawyer Desmond P. FitzGerald, of FitzGerald & Company, Boston, MA. …

posted by shelly on Jun 29

A few nice legal forms images I found:

The Jacksons
legal forms

Image by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer
The Jacksons enjoyed dinner and after party at APPETITO, The Rocks, Sydney, Australia
As you may have heard, The Jacksons are currently enjoying a music tour ‘Unity’ in Australia.

What you didn’t know is that the group enjoyed dinner and an after party of sorts at APPETITO Pizza Pasta Bar on George St, The Rocks, last night.

The Jackson’s (Jermaine, Marlon, Jackie and Tito) stayed at the popular pizza bar for about an hour and have really been enjoying their time in Sydney.

Insiders speculate that the tour is helping bring further emotional healing to the family after the well documented and untimely death of Michael Jackson, back in 2009. To state the obviously, the tour is also assisting the bottom line finances of the remaining brothers.

We wish The Jacksons well as their Australian and global ‘Unity’ tour continues.

About…

The Jacksons are The First Family of Music. Performing since the 60’s, The Jacksons are among the world’s most well known musicians.

Biography…

The Jackson 5 were one of the biggest phenomenons in pop music during the early ’70s, and the last great group to come out of the Motown hitmaking machine before Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder shifted the label’s focus to more individual visions. The Jackson 5’s infectious brand of funky pop-soul was a definite departure from the typically smooth, elegant Motown sound, as befitting the group’s youth and the dawn of a new decade. That youth, coupled with the merchandising juggernaut that sprang up behind them, inevitably got them tagged a bubblegum group. But they were far more talented musically than that label would suggest, especially lead singer Michael, and their material, while sunny and upbeat, didn’t pander to its audience. Solo careers and overexposure gradually weakened the Jackson 5, but their best music still holds up surprisingly well as some of the most vibrant mainstream pop/R&B of its era.

Originally, the Jackson 5 were composed of brothers Jackie (born Sigmund Jackson, May 4, 1951), Tito (guitar, born Toriano Jackson, October 15, 1953), Jermaine (bass, lead vocals, born December 11, 1954), Marlon (born March 12, 1957), and Michael (lead vocals, born August 29, 1958). By all accounts, the Jackson family’s upbringing in Gary, IN, was strict; their mother Katherine was a devout Jehovah’s Witness, and their father Joe was a stern, temperamental disciplinarian. Allowed few outside interests, the boys gravitated to music, which was in their blood — prior to his job as a crane operator for a steel company, Joe had played guitar in an R&B group called the Falcons (not the same group that launched Wilson Pickett’s career). One night, Joe discovered that Jackie, Tito, and Jermaine had been playing his treasured old guitar without permission; though initially furious, he quickly discovered that his sons had genuine talent, and began to conceive of a family singing group that might eventually get them out of their tough working-class life in Gary. The eldest three sons began performing around the area together in 1962, teamed with two cousins (Johnny Jackson and Ronnie Rancifer), who were replaced by Marlon and five-year-old Michael. Supervised by Joe, who became their manager and began working only part-time, the group practiced and rehearsed often, and improved as dancers, singers, and instrumentalists at a rapid rate. In particular, Michael proved himself a dynamic performer, soon replacing Jermaine as the featured lead vocalist, and establishing himself as a nimble dancer able to mimic talents like James Brown. At first, the group was known as Ripples & Waves Plus Michael, then the Jackson Brothers, and finally the Jackson 5.

In 1966, the Jackson 5 won an important local talent competition with a Michael-led rendition of the Temptations’ "My Girl." Their father, who had been chauffeuring them to out-of-state performances, also booked their first paid professional gigs that year. In 1967, the group won an amateur talent competition at Harlem’s legendary Apollo Theater, where they earned an influential fan in Gladys Knight (probably the first person to recommend the group to Motown). At the end of the year, the Jackson 5 made their first studio recordings for the small Gary-based Steeltown label, and their single "Big Boy" became something of a local hit. Championed again to Motown by Bobby Taylor, a member of the Vancouvers who’d seen the group in Chicago, and Diana Ross, the Jackson 5 finally got a chance to audition for the label in the summer of 1968. Desperately needing new blood, an impressed Berry Gordy signed the group and flew them out to his new headquarters in Los Angeles, where he and his assistants groomed them to be the label’s next breakout stars. Having lost his famed Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team, Gordy formed a new partnership with Freddie Perren, Fonce Mizell, and Deke Richards dubbed the Corporation, which set about crafting material for the group.

In August 1969, shortly before Michael turned 11, the Jackson 5 opened for Diana Ross at the L.A. Forum, and in December, they issued their debut album, Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5. On October 7, 1969, the Jackson 5 released their first single, "I Want You Back," a Corporation composition that had originally been intended for Gladys Knight. It was an instant smash, hitting number one on both the pop and R&B charts. So did their next two singles, "ABC" and "The Love You Save" (both from their second album, ABC), which solidified the group’s so-called bubblegum-soul sound and certified them as pop sensations. Third Album was released before year’s end, spawning the hit ballad "I’ll Be There," which not only proved that the group (and lead singer Michael) were more mature and versatile than their bright, bouncy initial singles let on, but also made them the first group in pop history to have their first four singles hit number one. It also became the best-selling single in Motown history, spending a stellar five weeks at number one. And it had still been less than a year since the group’s national debut.

A virtual Jackson 5 cottage industry sprang up in the wake of their success, producing everything from dolls to a cartoon show on — what else? — the ABC network (during the summer of 1971). Younger and younger listeners were brought into the fold, adding to an already broad appeal that transcended color lines, and the record label that once billed itself as "the Sound of Young America" could once again lay legitimate claim to the title. Meanwhile, following their four straight number ones, the Jackson 5 opened 1971 with a pair of number two hits, "Mama’s Pearl" and the ballad "Never Can Say Goodbye"; "Maybe Tomorrow" was their first single not to make the pop Top Ten, though it still reached the R&B Top Five. That year, Motown executives began grooming Michael and Jermaine for solo careers that would run concurrently with the Jackson 5. Michael was the first to debut on his own (toward the end of 1971), and was an instant success; his first two singles, "Got to Be There" and "Rockin’ Robin," both made the Top Five, and later in 1972 he scored his first pop number one with "Ben." Jermaine debuted at the end of 1972, and his first single, "Daddy’s Home," reached the Top Ten, though the follow-ups didn’t sustain the momentum as well as Michael.

In the meantime, the fantastically hyped Jackson 5 craze was beginning to cool down. Their prolific LP release schedule slowed a bit, and while their singles continued to perform reliably well on the R&B charts, they were no longer a sure-fire bet for the pop Top Ten. After a relatively lengthy drought, the Jackson 5 scored what would be their last major smash for Motown, the 1974 number two hit "Dancing Machine," a nod to the emerging sound of disco (it also topped the R&B charts). The group’s frustrations with Motown had been building — not only did the label seem less interested in their career, but they still refused to allow the Jacksons to write or choose their own material, or play their own instruments on their records. Finally, in early 1976, they left Motown to sign with Epic. When the legal battles finally ended, Motown won a breach-of-contract settlement and retained rights to the Jackson 5 name, forcing the group to become the Jacksons. They also lost Jermaine, whose marriage to Berry Gordy’s daughter Hazel made it extremely impractical for him to join his brothers. He was replaced by younger brother Randy (born Steven Randall Jackson, October 29, 1961), who had been appearing (unofficially) with the group as a percussionist for some time.

The Jacksons’ first few records on Epic were somewhat erratic affairs produced by Philly soul legends Gamble & Huff. However, the group truly assumed control over their music and hit full stride on 1978’s Destiny, which most regard as the strongest studio LP the Jacksons recorded together in any incarnation. Destiny was self-produced and largely self-written, and its success helped encourage Michael to return to solo work. 1979’s brilliant Off the Wall made him a star in his own right, signifying his arrival as a mature adult artist, but he remained with his brothers for the time being, helping them record a Grammy-nominated follow-up to Destiny in 1980’s Triumph. The staggering success of Michael’s next solo album, Thriller, signaled the beginning of the end for the Jacksons, but not quite yet; Jermaine rejoined the group for 1984’s Victory, the only album to feature all six brothers. The single "State of Shock," which featured guest vocalist Mick Jagger, hit number three that year, and the group’s ensuing tour was a blockbuster success, despite expensive (for the time) ticket prices. Michael and Marlon both left the Jacksons, the latter trying out an unsuccessful solo career; Randy, Tito, and Jackie appeared as the Jacksons on the soundtrack of Burglar, and subsequently became highly regarded session musicians. The Jacksons reconvened in 1989 for the album 2300 Jackson Street, which featured every Jackson sibling save LaToya on the title cut. However, it wasn’t as successful as hoped, and to date there have been no further reunions on record. In 1997, the Jackson 5 were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide (Credit: The Jacksons)

Websites

The Jacksons official website www.thejacksons.com

APPETITO www.appetito.com.au

Eva Rinaldi Photography www.evarinaldi.com

Music News Australia www.musicnewsaustralia.com

The Jacksons
legal forms

Image by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer
The Jacksons enjoyed dinner and after party at APPETITO, The Rocks, Sydney, Australia
As you may have heard, The Jacksons are currently enjoying a music tour ‘Unity’ in Australia.

What you didn’t know is that the group enjoyed dinner and an after party of sorts at APPETITO Pizza Pasta Bar on George St, The Rocks, last night.

The Jackson’s (Jermaine, Marlon, Jackie and Tito) stayed at the popular pizza bar for about an hour and have really been enjoying their time in Sydney.

Insiders speculate that the tour is helping bring further emotional healing to the family after the well documented and untimely death of Michael Jackson, back in 2009. To state the obviously, the tour is also assisting the bottom line finances of the remaining brothers.

We wish The Jacksons well as their Australian and global ‘Unity’ tour continues.

About…

The Jacksons are The First Family of Music. Performing since the 60’s, The Jacksons are among the world’s most well known musicians.

Biography…

The Jackson 5 were one of the biggest phenomenons in pop music during the early ’70s, and the last great group to come out of the Motown hitmaking machine before Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder shifted the label’s focus to more individual visions. The Jackson 5’s infectious brand of funky pop-soul was a definite departure from the typically smooth, elegant Motown sound, as befitting the group’s youth and the dawn of a new decade. That youth, coupled with the merchandising juggernaut that sprang up behind them, inevitably got them tagged a bubblegum group. But they were far more talented musically than that label would suggest, especially lead singer Michael, and their material, while sunny and upbeat, didn’t pander to its audience. Solo careers and overexposure gradually weakened the Jackson 5, but their best music still holds up surprisingly well as some of the most vibrant mainstream pop/R&B of its era.

Originally, the Jackson 5 were composed of brothers Jackie (born Sigmund Jackson, May 4, 1951), Tito (guitar, born Toriano Jackson, October 15, 1953), Jermaine (bass, lead vocals, born December 11, 1954), Marlon (born March 12, 1957), and Michael (lead vocals, born August 29, 1958). By all accounts, the Jackson family’s upbringing in Gary, IN, was strict; their mother Katherine was a devout Jehovah’s Witness, and their father Joe was a stern, temperamental disciplinarian. Allowed few outside interests, the boys gravitated to music, which was in their blood — prior to his job as a crane operator for a steel company, Joe had played guitar in an R&B group called the Falcons (not the same group that launched Wilson Pickett’s career). One night, Joe discovered that Jackie, Tito, and Jermaine had been playing his treasured old guitar without permission; though initially furious, he quickly discovered that his sons had genuine talent, and began to conceive of a family singing group that might eventually get them out of their tough working-class life in Gary. The eldest three sons began performing around the area together in 1962, teamed with two cousins (Johnny Jackson and Ronnie Rancifer), who were replaced by Marlon and five-year-old Michael. Supervised by Joe, who became their manager and began working only part-time, the group practiced and rehearsed often, and improved as dancers, singers, and instrumentalists at a rapid rate. In particular, Michael proved himself a dynamic performer, soon replacing Jermaine as the featured lead vocalist, and establishing himself as a nimble dancer able to mimic talents like James Brown. At first, the group was known as Ripples & Waves Plus Michael, then the Jackson Brothers, and finally the Jackson 5.

In 1966, the Jackson 5 won an important local talent competition with a Michael-led rendition of the Temptations’ "My Girl." Their father, who had been chauffeuring them to out-of-state performances, also booked their first paid professional gigs that year. In 1967, the group won an amateur talent competition at Harlem’s legendary Apollo Theater, where they earned an influential fan in Gladys Knight (probably the first person to recommend the group to Motown). At the end of the year, the Jackson 5 made their first studio recordings for the small Gary-based Steeltown label, and their single "Big Boy" became something of a local hit. Championed again to Motown by Bobby Taylor, a member of the Vancouvers who’d seen the group in Chicago, and Diana Ross, the Jackson 5 finally got a chance to audition for the label in the summer of 1968. Desperately needing new blood, an impressed Berry Gordy signed the group and flew them out to his new headquarters in Los Angeles, where he and his assistants groomed them to be the label’s next breakout stars. Having lost his famed Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team, Gordy formed a new partnership with Freddie Perren, Fonce Mizell, and Deke Richards dubbed the Corporation, which set about crafting material for the group.

In August 1969, shortly before Michael turned 11, the Jackson 5 opened for Diana Ross at the L.A. Forum, and in December, they issued their debut album, Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5. On October 7, 1969, the Jackson 5 released their first single, "I Want You Back," a Corporation composition that had originally been intended for Gladys Knight. It was an instant smash, hitting number one on both the pop and R&B charts. So did their next two singles, "ABC" and "The Love You Save" (both from their second album, ABC), which solidified the group’s so-called bubblegum-soul sound and certified them as pop sensations. Third Album was released before year’s end, spawning the hit ballad "I’ll Be There," which not only proved that the group (and lead singer Michael) were more mature and versatile than their bright, bouncy initial singles let on, but also made them the first group in pop history to have their first four singles hit number one. It also became the best-selling single in Motown history, spending a stellar five weeks at number one. And it had still been less than a year since the group’s national debut.

A virtual Jackson 5 cottage industry sprang up in the wake of their success, producing everything from dolls to a cartoon show on — what else? — the ABC network (during the summer of 1971). Younger and younger listeners were brought into the fold, adding to an already broad appeal that transcended color lines, and the record label that once billed itself as "the Sound of Young America" could once again lay legitimate claim to the title. Meanwhile, following their four straight number ones, the Jackson 5 opened 1971 with a pair of number two hits, "Mama’s Pearl" and the ballad "Never Can Say Goodbye"; "Maybe Tomorrow" was their first single not to make the pop Top Ten, though it still reached the R&B Top Five. That year, Motown executives began grooming Michael and Jermaine for solo careers that would run concurrently with the Jackson 5. Michael was the first to debut on his own (toward the end of 1971), and was an instant success; his first two singles, "Got to Be There" and "Rockin’ Robin," both made the Top Five, and later in 1972 he scored his first pop number one with "Ben." Jermaine debuted at the end of 1972, and his first single, "Daddy’s Home," reached the Top Ten, though the follow-ups didn’t sustain the momentum as well as Michael.

In the meantime, the fantastically hyped Jackson 5 craze was beginning to cool down. Their prolific LP release schedule slowed a bit, and while their singles continued to perform reliably well on the R&B charts, they were no longer a sure-fire bet for the pop Top Ten. After a relatively lengthy drought, the Jackson 5 scored what would be their last major smash for Motown, the 1974 number two hit "Dancing Machine," a nod to the emerging sound of disco (it also topped the R&B charts). The group’s frustrations with Motown had been building — not only did the label seem less interested in their career, but they still refused to allow the Jacksons to write or choose their own material, or play their own instruments on their records. Finally, in early 1976, they left Motown to sign with Epic. When the legal battles finally ended, Motown won a breach-of-contract settlement and retained rights to the Jackson 5 name, forcing the group to become the Jacksons. They also lost Jermaine, whose marriage to Berry Gordy’s daughter Hazel made it extremely impractical for him to join his brothers. He was replaced by younger brother Randy (born Steven Randall Jackson, October 29, 1961), who had been appearing (unofficially) with the group as a percussionist for some time.

The Jacksons’ first few records on Epic were somewhat erratic affairs produced by Philly soul legends Gamble & Huff. However, the group truly assumed control over their music and hit full stride on 1978’s Destiny, which most regard as the strongest studio LP the Jacksons recorded together in any incarnation. Destiny was self-produced and largely self-written, and its success helped encourage Michael to return to solo work. 1979’s brilliant Off the Wall made him a star in his own right, signifying his arrival as a mature adult artist, but he remained with his brothers for the time being, helping them record a Grammy-nominated follow-up to Destiny in 1980’s Triumph. The staggering success of Michael’s next solo album, Thriller, signaled the beginning of the end for the Jacksons, but not quite yet; Jermaine rejoined the group for 1984’s Victory, the only album to feature all six brothers. The single "State of Shock," which featured guest vocalist Mick Jagger, hit number three that year, and the group’s ensuing tour was a blockbuster success, despite expensive (for the time) ticket prices. Michael and Marlon both left the Jacksons, the latter trying out an unsuccessful solo career; Randy, Tito, and Jackie appeared as the Jacksons on the soundtrack of Burglar, and subsequently became highly regarded session musicians. The Jacksons reconvened in 1989 for the album 2300 Jackson Street, which featured every Jackson sibling save LaToya on the title cut. However, it wasn’t as successful as hoped, and to date there have been no further reunions on record. In 1997, the Jackson 5 were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide (Credit: The Jacksons)

Websites

The Jacksons official website www.thejacksons.com

APPETITO www.appetito.com.au

Eva Rinaldi Photography www.evarinaldi.com

Music News Australia www.musicnewsaustralia.com

The Jacksons
legal forms

Image by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer
The Jacksons enjoyed dinner and after party at APPETITO, The Rocks, Sydney, Australia
As you may have heard, The Jacksons are currently enjoying a music tour ‘Unity’ in Australia.

What you didn’t know is that the group enjoyed dinner and an after party of sorts at APPETITO Pizza Pasta Bar on George St, The Rocks, last night.

The Jackson’s (Jermaine, Marlon, Jackie and Tito) stayed at the popular pizza bar for about an hour and have really been enjoying their time in Sydney.

Insiders speculate that the tour is helping bring further emotional healing to the family after the well documented and untimely death of Michael Jackson, back in 2009. To state the obviously, the tour is also assisting the bottom line finances of the remaining brothers.

We wish The Jacksons well as their Australian and global ‘Unity’ tour continues.

About…

The Jacksons are The First Family of Music. Performing since the 60’s, The Jacksons are among the world’s most well known musicians.

Biography…

The Jackson 5 were one of the biggest phenomenons in pop music during the early ’70s, and the last great group to come out of the Motown hitmaking machine before Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder shifted the label’s focus to more individual visions. The Jackson 5’s infectious brand of funky pop-soul was a definite departure from the typically smooth, elegant Motown sound, as befitting the group’s youth and the dawn of a new decade. That youth, coupled with the merchandising juggernaut that sprang up behind them, inevitably got them tagged a bubblegum group. But they were far more talented musically than that label would suggest, especially lead singer Michael, and their material, while sunny and upbeat, didn’t pander to its audience. Solo careers and overexposure gradually weakened the Jackson 5, but their best music still holds up surprisingly well as some of the most vibrant mainstream pop/R&B of its era.

Originally, the Jackson 5 were composed of brothers Jackie (born Sigmund Jackson, May 4, 1951), Tito (guitar, born Toriano Jackson, October 15, 1953), Jermaine (bass, lead vocals, born December 11, 1954), Marlon (born March 12, 1957), and Michael (lead vocals, born August 29, 1958). By all accounts, the Jackson family’s upbringing in Gary, IN, was strict; their mother Katherine was a devout Jehovah’s Witness, and their father Joe was a stern, temperamental disciplinarian. Allowed few outside interests, the boys gravitated to music, which was in their blood — prior to his job as a crane operator for a steel company, Joe had played guitar in an R&B group called the Falcons (not the same group that launched Wilson Pickett’s career). One night, Joe discovered that Jackie, Tito, and Jermaine had been playing his treasured old guitar without permission; though initially furious, he quickly discovered that his sons had genuine talent, and began to conceive of a family singing group that might eventually get them out of their tough working-class life in Gary. The eldest three sons began performing around the area together in 1962, teamed with two cousins (Johnny Jackson and Ronnie Rancifer), who were replaced by Marlon and five-year-old Michael. Supervised by Joe, who became their manager and began working only part-time, the group practiced and rehearsed often, and improved as dancers, singers, and instrumentalists at a rapid rate. In particular, Michael proved himself a dynamic performer, soon replacing Jermaine as the featured lead vocalist, and establishing himself as a nimble dancer able to mimic talents like James Brown. At first, the group was known as Ripples & Waves Plus Michael, then the Jackson Brothers, and finally the Jackson 5.

In 1966, the Jackson 5 won an important local talent competition with a Michael-led rendition of the Temptations’ "My Girl." Their father, who had been chauffeuring them to out-of-state performances, also booked their first paid professional gigs that year. In 1967, the group won an amateur talent competition at Harlem’s legendary Apollo Theater, where they earned an influential fan in Gladys Knight (probably the first person to recommend the group to Motown). At the end of the year, the Jackson 5 made their first studio recordings for the small Gary-based Steeltown label, and their single "Big Boy" became something of a local hit. Championed again to Motown by Bobby Taylor, a member of the Vancouvers who’d seen the group in Chicago, and Diana Ross, the Jackson 5 finally got a chance to audition for the label in the summer of 1968. Desperately needing new blood, an impressed Berry Gordy signed the group and flew them out to his new headquarters in Los Angeles, where he and his assistants groomed them to be the label’s next breakout stars. Having lost his famed Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team, Gordy formed a new partnership with Freddie Perren, Fonce Mizell, and Deke Richards dubbed the Corporation, which set about crafting material for the group.

In August 1969, shortly before Michael turned 11, the Jackson 5 opened for Diana Ross at the L.A. Forum, and in December, they issued their debut album, Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5. On October 7, 1969, the Jackson 5 released their first single, "I Want You Back," a Corporation composition that had originally been intended for Gladys Knight. It was an instant smash, hitting number one on both the pop and R&B charts. So did their next two singles, "ABC" and "The Love You Save" (both from their second album, ABC), which solidified the group’s so-called bubblegum-soul sound and certified them as pop sensations. Third Album was released before year’s end, spawning the hit ballad "I’ll Be There," which not only proved that the group (and lead singer Michael) were more mature and versatile than their bright, bouncy initial singles let on, but also made them the first group in pop history to have their first four singles hit number one. It also became the best-selling single in Motown history, spending a stellar five weeks at number one. And it had still been less than a year since the group’s national debut.

A virtual Jackson 5 cottage industry sprang up in the wake of their success, producing everything from dolls to a cartoon show on — what else? — the ABC network (during the summer of 1971). Younger and younger listeners were brought into the fold, adding to an already broad appeal that transcended color lines, and the record label that once billed itself as "the Sound of Young America" could once again lay legitimate claim to the title. Meanwhile, following their four straight number ones, the Jackson 5 opened 1971 with a pair of number two hits, "Mama’s Pearl" and the ballad "Never Can Say Goodbye"; "Maybe Tomorrow" was their first single not to make the pop Top Ten, though it still reached the R&B Top Five. That year, Motown executives began grooming Michael and Jermaine for solo careers that would run concurrently with the Jackson 5. Michael was the first to debut on his own (toward the end of 1971), and was an instant success; his first two singles, "Got to Be There" and "Rockin’ Robin," both made the Top Five, and later in 1972 he scored his first pop number one with "Ben." Jermaine debuted at the end of 1972, and his first single, "Daddy’s Home," reached the Top Ten, though the follow-ups didn’t sustain the momentum as well as Michael.

In the meantime, the fantastically hyped Jackson 5 craze was beginning to cool down. Their prolific LP release schedule slowed a bit, and while their singles continued to perform reliably well on the R&B charts, they were no longer a sure-fire bet for the pop Top Ten. After a relatively lengthy drought, the Jackson 5 scored what would be their last major smash for Motown, the 1974 number two hit "Dancing Machine," a nod to the emerging sound of disco (it also topped the R&B charts). The group’s frustrations with Motown had been building — not only did the label seem less interested in their career, but they still refused to allow the Jacksons to write or choose their own material, or play their own instruments on their records. Finally, in early 1976, they left Motown to sign with Epic. When the legal battles finally ended, Motown won a breach-of-contract settlement and retained rights to the Jackson 5 name, forcing the group to become the Jacksons. They also lost Jermaine, whose marriage to Berry Gordy’s daughter Hazel made it extremely impractical for him to join his brothers. He was replaced by younger brother Randy (born Steven Randall Jackson, October 29, 1961), who had been appearing (unofficially) with the group as a percussionist for some time.

The Jacksons’ first few records on Epic were somewhat erratic affairs produced by Philly soul legends Gamble & Huff. However, the group truly assumed control over their music and hit full stride on 1978’s Destiny, which most regard as the strongest studio LP the Jacksons recorded together in any incarnation. Destiny was self-produced and largely self-written, and its success helped encourage Michael to return to solo work. 1979’s brilliant Off the Wall made him a star in his own right, signifying his arrival as a mature adult artist, but he remained with his brothers for the time being, helping them record a Grammy-nominated follow-up to Destiny in 1980’s Triumph. The staggering success of Michael’s next solo album, Thriller, signaled the beginning of the end for the Jacksons, but not quite yet; Jermaine rejoined the group for 1984’s Victory, the only album to feature all six brothers. The single "State of Shock," which featured guest vocalist Mick Jagger, hit number three that year, and the group’s ensuing tour was a blockbuster success, despite expensive (for the time) ticket prices. Michael and Marlon both left the Jacksons, the latter trying out an unsuccessful solo career; Randy, Tito, and Jackie appeared as the Jacksons on the soundtrack of Burglar, and subsequently became highly regarded session musicians. The Jacksons reconvened in 1989 for the album 2300 Jackson Street, which featured every Jackson sibling save LaToya on the title cut. However, it wasn’t as successful as hoped, and to date there have been no further reunions on record. In 1997, the Jackson 5 were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide (Credit: The Jacksons)

Websites

The Jacksons official website www.thejacksons.com

APPETITO www.appetito.com.au

Eva Rinaldi Photography www.evarinaldi.com

Music News Australia www.musicnewsaustralia.com

posted by shelly on Jun 29

Check out these legal forms images:

Squat Sounds *
legal forms

Image by Sterneck
.

SQUAT – SOUNDS

AUTONOMES KULTURZENTRUM HANAU
(Besetztes Haus / Metzgerstrasse-Squat in Hanau / Germany).

Photographs 1987-1994

– Please scroll down for english and german info) –

The Squat – Photos:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627799174125

Squating the Parliament (1988):
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923787960

Concert-Photos 1987-1988:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627799191443

Concert-Photos 1989-1990:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923799072

Concert-Photos 1991-1992:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923811302

Concert-Photos 1993-1994:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923815978

– Concert-Photos 1989-1990:
Archbishop Kebab (Edinburgh, Scotland) – 1989
Citizen Fish (Warminster, England) – 1990
Die Trottel (Budapest, Hungary) – 1988
Do Or Die (Amsterdam, Netherlands) – 1990
Israelvis (Trondhrim, Norway) – 1989
Kina (Valle d’Aosta, Italy) – 1990
Life… But How To Live It? (Oslo, Norway) – 1989
Political Asylum (Edinburgh, Scotland) – 1989
Rikk Agnew (Fullerton, USA) – 1990
Robsie Richter (Hanau, Germany) – 1990
Sharon Tates Children (Stuttgart, Germany) – 1989
Sore Throat (Yorkshire, England) – 1990
Spongetunnel (Chicago, USA) – 1989
Ugly Food (Lübeck, Germany, Odense, Denmark) – 1989
Zygote (Bath, England) – 1990
….. and Friends and …..
………

There were a lot more bands playing in the squat.
If you have photographs or recordings – please get in contact:
contact@sterneck.net
Thanx! *

– * –

THE SQUATED AUTONOMOUS CULTURE CENTER
METZGERSTRASSE / HANAU

In December 1986 some people in Hanau (Germany) decided to squat a house that had been empty for a long time, Metzgerstraße 8. They restored it and filled this free space with a new life.

Soon it became an ’Autonomous Culture-Center’ for the people and by the people, and also a focal point for a solidaric projects and for the resistance against ruling systems in all their repressive forms. The center has had a long history of attempts to establish a self-determined culture-center in Hanau, although it has always been repressed by the local city council.

The basic forum of the center is the ”squatter meeting,” which is open to everyone who has an interest in the squat as a counter-cultural free space. Decisions are made on the consent principle, which means that they try to find a decision that can be supported by everyone. Many activists in the squat, but not all, describe themselves as members of the autonomy movement, which connects anarchist, communist and feminist ideas.

At the moment there are a lot of projects, groups, and events that take place in the center. Everything is done on a do-it-yourself and nonprofit basis; no one receives money for her or his work. Solidarity, trust and self-determination are the basis for all work. Here are some examples:

– The ’Infoladen’ (Infoshop): The Infoshop is an opportunity to get information that can’t be found in the normal bourgeois media. There are a lot of autonomous, left radical and feminist leaflets, brochures and newspapers available. There is also a small media center and an archive that includes material on topics like anti-fascism, atomic politics, women’s liberation, internationalism, etc.

– The ’Volxküche’ (Peoples Kitchen): Frequently people from the community cook a vegetarian meal that is available for a small price. The idea behind this is to overcome isolation between people and the patriarchal roles typical in the kitchen, and, of course, to provide a good tasting meal for many people.

– The Concerts: Concerts in the center are organized, and absolutely dedicated to the principle of working in a self-determined way without a manager, an agency, or even a contract. The bands that play in the squat should have a mutual relation to the ideas of the center. There are no musical limits: Local punk bands have played there as well as jazz bands from North-America and Avantguarde projects from Eastern Europe. Some of the performances have been released on tapes and records.

In a way, the things that happen between the people in the center are more important than the events: changes in behavior, opportunities to live together without hierarchical structures, and new ways of relating. Although the squat is like an island in some ways, it’s far from a concrete utopia. Problems in interpersonal relations exist, as well as differences between ideals and real behaviour.

If people want to go alternative ways, the authorities try to stop them. In Hanau the local city council has said for a long time that none of the things the squatters do and organize represent culture. They decided in parliament that the center was to be closed and torn down without an alternative. In place of the squat, they planned to build five parking places. A decision that is very symbolic and characteristic. Certainly, the real aim was to destroy the ideas and the structures this center stands for.

The answer of the supporters of the Autonomous Culture-Center was the squatting of the parliament of the city. The politicians went out of the building and the squatters voted for the continuation of the center.

Up to now the authorities have not been able to realize their plans for various reasons. On the one hand there are many people who support the squat. There are also legal difficulties around closing it, and they are afraid of the resistance and activities that could take place after closing the squat.

But even if they evict the center, they can’t repress the ideas that the squat stands for. It’s about a self-determined culture and a self-determined life. It’s about dreams and ideals. It’s about consequence and change, here and now.

Wolfgang Sterneck, 2001.

Autonomes Kulturzentrum
Metzgerstrasse 8, D-63450 Hanau, Germany.

Autonomes Kulturzentrum Metzgerstraße:
www.metzgerstrasse-hanau.org
de-de.facebook.com/people/Metzgerstrasse-Acht-Hanau/10000…
www.myspace.com/metzgerstrasse
www.sterneck.net/squat

Info on the Project of John Cage and Sterneck / KomistA in benefit of the squat:
www.sterneck.net/john-cage/metzgerstrasse-e

– * –

SUBVERSIVE SOUNDS *

Konzerte im Autonomen Kulturzentrum Hanau.

Das besetzte Haus

Im Dezember 1986 kam es in Hanau zur Besetzung eines ehemaligen Nachtclubs in der Metzgerstraße 8. Das Gebäude, das zuvor über Jahre hinweg leer stand, wurde renoviert, neu gestaltet, umbenannt und wird seitdem als Autonomes Kulturzentrum genutzt. Das Ziel der Besetzung war es, einen Freiraum zu schaffen, in dem die Vorstellung einer autonomen Kultur wie auch die Wiederaneignung des entfremdeten Alltags konkret umsetzbar wird.

Vor diesem Hintergrund gelang es, ein Zentrum zu entwickeln, in dem solidarisches Handeln, kollektives Leben und politische Identität auf vielen Ebenen verschmelzen oder sich zumindest annähern. Die Metzgerstraße wurde dadurch zu einem wichtigen Bezugspunkt von dem auf verschiedenen Ebenen vielschichtige politische, soziale und kulturelle Impulse ausgingen.

Im Laufe der Jahre entstanden vielfältige Projekte wie die Volxküche (Essen zum Selbstkostenpreis), der Infoladen (Aktuelle politische Informationen und Archiv) und das Basta-Cafe (Treffpunkt und Sozialberatung). Die politischen Schwerpunkte der im Kulturzentrum aktiven Gruppen liegen unter anderen in den Bereichen ‘Internationale Solidarität’, Antifaschismus und ‘Soziale Veränderung’.

Die Entscheidungen innerhalb des Kulturzentrums werden basisdemokratisch nach dem Konsensprinzip getroffen. Alle Aktivitäten basieren auf einer idealistischen Grundhaltung. Keine Person aus dem Zentrum erhält für ihre Tätigkeiten eine finanzielle Entlohnung.

Selbstbestimmte Kultur ohne Kommerz

Musik hatte von Anfang an in der Metzgerstraße eine besondere Bedeutung. Über das Musikhören hinaus machen viele AktivistInnen selbst Musik, veröffentlichen eigene Aufnahmen oder organisieren Konzerte. Im Sinne des DIY-Prinzipes (‘Do it Yourself’) werden die Auftritte im direkten Kontakt mit den MusikerInnen ohne Konzertagenturen und auch ohne Verträge auf völlig nichtkommerzieller Basis organisiert.

Eine Grundlage bildet ein solidarisches Verhältnis der MusikerInnen zur Metzgerstraße, was sich unter anderem auch in der Gage ausdrückt, die sich in der Regel auf die für die Band entstandenen Unkosten und die Verpflegung beschränkt. Der Eintrittspreis ist so ausgerichtet, dass er für alle interessierten Personen erschwinglich ist und die anfallenden Kosten deckt bzw. im Rahmen von Benefiz-Konzerten bestimmte Projekte unterstützt.

Freiräume statt Parkplätze

Während der ehemalige sozialdemokratische Kulturdezernat Hanaus davon sprach, dass in der Metzgerstraße keine Kultur stattfindet, bildete dass selbstorganisierte Zentrum durch die Auftritte von Bands aus Westeuropa und Nordamerika einen im Hanauer Kulturleben herausragenden internationalen Bezugspunkt. Die musikalische Bandbreite umfasst unter anderem Rockmusik in den verschiedensten Schattierungen, Punk, Hardcore, Folk und Jazz, sowie experimentelle und improvisierte Musik. Lokale Nachwuchsbands traten im Laufe der Jahre genauso auf wie renommierte Gruppen aus unterschiedlichsten Ländern. Einen Kultcharakter erlangten zudem die Nachtcafe-Sessions, an denen jeder und jede teilnehmen konnte.

Die Aufnahmen einiger Konzerte wurden später auf verschiedenen Tonträgern veröffentlicht. 1992 kam es daneben zur Veröffentlichung eines der Metzgerstraße gewidmeten Stücks des Avantgarde-Komponisten John Cage.

In den Anfangsjahren plante der Hanauer Magistrat das Haus nach einer Räumung abreißen zu lassen, um dort stattdessen fünf Parkplätze zu errichten. Die Kulturpolitik des Magistrates entlarvte sich dadurch in einer kaum zu übertreffenden symbolhaften Weise selbst. Das Vorhaben wurde jedoch nicht zuletzt in Folge einer Besetzung des Stadtparlamentes durch Unterstützerinnen des Kulturzentrums nicht weiter verfolgt.

Rund 25 Jahre nach der Besetzung wird das Haus weiterhin als Kulturzentrum genutzt. Im ansonsten auf Konsum und Kommerz ausgerichteten Stadtzentrum Hanaus ist es mit seinen vielfältigen Projekten kreativer wie auch subversiver Freiraum.

Wolfgang Sterneck, September 2011.

Autonomes Kulturzentrum Metzgerstraße:
www.metzgerstrasse-hanau.org
de-de.facebook.com/people/Metzgerstrasse-Acht-Hanau/10000…
www.myspace.com/metzgerstrasse
www.sterneck.net/squat

Eine ausführliche Beschreibung der Geschichte des Kulturzentrums:
Freiräume entwickeln – Das besetzte autonome Kulturzentrum Metzgerstraße Hanau
www.sterneck.net/squat/metzgerstrasse-d

English Info:
The squated Autonomous Culture Center Metzgerstrasse Hanau
www.sterneck.net/squat/metzgerstrasse-e

Infos zum Benefiz-Projekt von John Cage und Sterneck / KomistA für das Kulturzentrum:
www.sterneck.net/john-cage

– * –

Foto: 1988 ? 1989

.

Squat Sounds *
legal forms

Image by Sterneck
.

SQUAT – SOUNDS

AUTONOMES KULTURZENTRUM HANAU
(Besetztes Haus / Metzgerstrasse-Squat in Hanau / Germany).

Photographs 1987-1994

– Please scroll down for english and german info) –

The Squat – Photos:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627799174125

Squating the Parliament (1988):
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923787960

Concert-Photos 1987-1988:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627799191443

Concert-Photos 1989-1990:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923799072

Concert-Photos 1991-1992:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923811302

Concert-Photos 1993-1994:
www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157627923815978

– Concert-Photos 1989-1990:
Archbishop Kebab (Edinburgh, Scotland) – 1989
Citizen Fish (Warminster, England) – 1990
Die Trottel (Budapest, Hungary) – 1988
Do Or Die (Amsterdam, Netherlands) – 1990
Israelvis (Trondhrim, Norway) – 1989
Kina (Valle d’Aosta, Italy) – 1990
Life… But How To Live It? (Oslo, Norway) – 1989
Political Asylum (Edinburgh, Scotland) – 1989
Rikk Agnew (Fullerton, USA) – 1990
Robsie Richter (Hanau, Germany) – 1990
Sharon Tates Children (Stuttgart, Germany) – 1989
Sore Throat (Yorkshire, England) – 1990
Spongetunnel (Chicago, USA) – 1989
Ugly Food (Lübeck, Germany, Odense, Denmark) – 1989
Zygote (Bath, England) – 1990
….. and Friends and …..
………

There were a lot more bands playing in the squat.
If you have photographs or recordings – please get in contact:
contact@sterneck.net
Thanx! *

– * –

THE SQUATED AUTONOMOUS CULTURE CENTER
METZGERSTRASSE / HANAU

In December 1986 some people in Hanau (Germany) decided to squat a house that had been empty for a long time, Metzgerstraße 8. They restored it and filled this free space with a new life.

Soon it became an ’Autonomous Culture-Center’ for the people and by the people, and also a focal point for a solidaric projects and for the resistance against ruling systems in all their repressive forms. The center has had a long history of attempts to establish a self-determined culture-center in Hanau, although it has always been repressed by the local city council.

The basic forum of the center is the ”squatter meeting,” which is open to everyone who has an interest in the squat as a counter-cultural free space. Decisions are made on the consent principle, which means that they try to find a decision that can be supported by everyone. Many activists in the squat, but not all, describe themselves as members of the autonomy movement, which connects anarchist, communist and feminist ideas.

At the moment there are a lot of projects, groups, and events that take place in the center. Everything is done on a do-it-yourself and nonprofit basis; no one receives money for her or his work. Solidarity, trust and self-determination are the basis for all work. Here are some examples:

– The ’Infoladen’ (Infoshop): The Infoshop is an opportunity to get information that can’t be found in the normal bourgeois media. There are a lot of autonomous, left radical and feminist leaflets, brochures and newspapers available. There is also a small media center and an archive that includes material on topics like anti-fascism, atomic politics, women’s liberation, internationalism, etc.

– The ’Volxküche’ (Peoples Kitchen): Frequently people from the community cook a vegetarian meal that is available for a small price. The idea behind this is to overcome isolation between people and the patriarchal roles typical in the kitchen, and, of course, to provide a good tasting meal for many people.

– The Concerts: Concerts in the center are organized, and absolutely dedicated to the principle of working in a self-determined way without a manager, an agency, or even a contract. The bands that play in the squat should have a mutual relation to the ideas of the center. There are no musical limits: Local punk bands have played there as well as jazz bands from North-America and Avantguarde projects from Eastern Europe. Some of the performances have been released on tapes and records.

In a way, the things that happen between the people in the center are more important than the events: changes in behavior, opportunities to live together without hierarchical structures, and new ways of relating. Although the squat is like an island in some ways, it’s far from a concrete utopia. Problems in interpersonal relations exist, as well as differences between ideals and real behaviour.

If people want to go alternative ways, the authorities try to stop them. In Hanau the local city council has said for a long time that none of the things the squatters do and organize represent culture. They decided in parliament that the center was to be closed and torn down without an alternative. In place of the squat, they planned to build five parking places. A decision that is very symbolic and characteristic. Certainly, the real aim was to destroy the ideas and the structures this center stands for.

The answer of the supporters of the Autonomous Culture-Center was the squatting of the parliament of the city. The politicians went out of the building and the squatters voted for the continuation of the center.

Up to now the authorities have not been able to realize their plans for various reasons. On the one hand there are many people who support the squat. There are also legal difficulties around closing it, and they are afraid of the resistance and activities that could take place after closing the squat.

But even if they evict the center, they can’t repress the ideas that the squat stands for. It’s about a self-determined culture and a self-determined life. It’s about dreams and ideals. It’s about consequence and change, here and now.

Wolfgang Sterneck, 2001.

Autonomes Kulturzentrum
Metzgerstrasse 8, D-63450 Hanau, Germany.

Autonomes Kulturzentrum Metzgerstraße:
www.metzgerstrasse-hanau.org
de-de.facebook.com/people/Metzgerstrasse-Acht-Hanau/10000…
www.myspace.com/metzgerstrasse
www.sterneck.net/squat

Info on the Project of John Cage and Sterneck / KomistA in benefit of the squat:
www.sterneck.net/john-cage/metzgerstrasse-e

– * –

SUBVERSIVE SOUNDS *

Konzerte im Autonomen Kulturzentrum Hanau.

Das besetzte Haus

Im Dezember 1986 kam es in Hanau zur Besetzung eines ehemaligen Nachtclubs in der Metzgerstraße 8. Das Gebäude, das zuvor über Jahre hinweg leer stand, wurde renoviert, neu gestaltet, umbenannt und wird seitdem als Autonomes Kulturzentrum genutzt. Das Ziel der Besetzung war es, einen Freiraum zu schaffen, in dem die Vorstellung einer autonomen Kultur wie auch die Wiederaneignung des entfremdeten Alltags konkret umsetzbar wird.

Vor diesem Hintergrund gelang es, ein Zentrum zu entwickeln, in dem solidarisches Handeln, kollektives Leben und politische Identität auf vielen Ebenen verschmelzen oder sich zumindest annähern. Die Metzgerstraße wurde dadurch zu einem wichtigen Bezugspunkt von dem auf verschiedenen Ebenen vielschichtige politische, soziale und kulturelle Impulse ausgingen.

Im Laufe der Jahre entstanden vielfältige Projekte wie die Volxküche (Essen zum Selbstkostenpreis), der Infoladen (Aktuelle politische Informationen und Archiv) und das Basta-Cafe (Treffpunkt und Sozialberatung). Die politischen Schwerpunkte der im Kulturzentrum aktiven Gruppen liegen unter anderen in den Bereichen ‘Internationale Solidarität’, Antifaschismus und ‘Soziale Veränderung’.

Die Entscheidungen innerhalb des Kulturzentrums werden basisdemokratisch nach dem Konsensprinzip getroffen. Alle Aktivitäten basieren auf einer idealistischen Grundhaltung. Keine Person aus dem Zentrum erhält für ihre Tätigkeiten eine finanzielle Entlohnung.

Selbstbestimmte Kultur ohne Kommerz

Musik hatte von Anfang an in der Metzgerstraße eine besondere Bedeutung. Über das Musikhören hinaus machen viele AktivistInnen selbst Musik, veröffentlichen eigene Aufnahmen oder organisieren Konzerte. Im Sinne des DIY-Prinzipes (‘Do it Yourself’) werden die Auftritte im direkten Kontakt mit den MusikerInnen ohne Konzertagenturen und auch ohne Verträge auf völlig nichtkommerzieller Basis organisiert.

Eine Grundlage bildet ein solidarisches Verhältnis der MusikerInnen zur Metzgerstraße, was sich unter anderem auch in der Gage ausdrückt, die sich in der Regel auf die für die Band entstandenen Unkosten und die Verpflegung beschränkt. Der Eintrittspreis ist so ausgerichtet, dass er für alle interessierten Personen erschwinglich ist und die anfallenden Kosten deckt bzw. im Rahmen von Benefiz-Konzerten bestimmte Projekte unterstützt.

Freiräume statt Parkplätze

Während der ehemalige sozialdemokratische Kulturdezernat Hanaus davon sprach, dass in der Metzgerstraße keine Kultur stattfindet, bildete dass selbstorganisierte Zentrum durch die Auftritte von Bands aus Westeuropa und Nordamerika einen im Hanauer Kulturleben herausragenden internationalen Bezugspunkt. Die musikalische Bandbreite umfasst unter anderem Rockmusik in den verschiedensten Schattierungen, Punk, Hardcore, Folk und Jazz, sowie experimentelle und improvisierte Musik. Lokale Nachwuchsbands traten im Laufe der Jahre genauso auf wie renommierte Gruppen aus unterschiedlichsten Ländern. Einen Kultcharakter erlangten zudem die Nachtcafe-Sessions, an denen jeder und jede teilnehmen konnte.

Die Aufnahmen einiger Konzerte wurden später auf verschiedenen Tonträgern veröffentlicht. 1992 kam es daneben zur Veröffentlichung eines der Metzgerstraße gewidmeten Stücks des Avantgarde-Komponisten John Cage.

In den Anfangsjahren plante der Hanauer Magistrat das Haus nach einer Räumung abreißen zu lassen, um dort stattdessen fünf Parkplätze zu errichten. Die Kulturpolitik des Magistrates entlarvte sich dadurch in einer kaum zu übertreffenden symbolhaften Weise selbst. Das Vorhaben wurde jedoch nicht zuletzt in Folge einer Besetzung des Stadtparlamentes durch Unterstützerinnen des Kulturzentrums nicht weiter verfolgt.

Rund 25 Jahre nach der Besetzung wird das Haus weiterhin als Kulturzentrum genutzt. Im ansonsten auf Konsum und Kommerz ausgerichteten Stadtzentrum Hanaus ist es mit seinen vielfältigen Projekten kreativer wie auch subversiver Freiraum.

Wolfgang Sterneck, September 2011.

Autonomes Kulturzentrum Metzgerstraße:
www.metzgerstrasse-hanau.org
de-de.facebook.com/people/Metzgerstrasse-Acht-Hanau/10000…
www.myspace.com/metzgerstrasse
www.sterneck.net/squat

Eine ausführliche Beschreibung der Geschichte des Kulturzentrums:
Freiräume entwickeln – Das besetzte autonome Kulturzentrum Metzgerstraße Hanau
www.sterneck.net/squat/metzgerstrasse-d

English Info:
The squated Autonomous Culture Center Metzgerstrasse Hanau
www.sterneck.net/squat/metzgerstrasse-e

Infos zum Benefiz-Projekt von John Cage und Sterneck / KomistA für das Kulturzentrum:
www.sterneck.net/john-cage

– * –

Foto: 1988 ? 1989

.

posted by shelly on Jun 29

Question by Desmond: What is the estimated year we will see moon immigration?
It is possible even by using the resources on the moon.

Best answer:

Answer by Sai D
Around 2065

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

posted by shelly on Jun 29

A few nice law firms images I found:

Chicago-Kent College of Law Reading Room
law firms

Image by Emily Barney
We have a lovely reading room on the 10th floor, students from other schools like to come here to study so we have to kick them all out to make room for our students during finals. The architecture firm that did it is Holabrid & Root – it’s been used in a number of film projects, including a Valentine’s Day commercial for Hallmark last year with a Michael Buble song. 😛

Panel: How Should The U.S. Handle The Collapse Of Systemically Important Firms?
law firms

Image by djevents
On stage: Marie Beaudette, Dow Jones Daily Bankruptcy Review (moderator); Barry E. Adler, New York University School of Law; Richard B. Levin, Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP; Richard B. Levin, Cravath, Seton Hall University

posted by shelly on Jun 28

Question by Highly functioning Dingbat: Can you help me with a computer application problem?
I received many legal type forms from a prospective employer. The problem is that after I download them to my computer,my computer wont let me write on these(PDF forms),or sign on them, So, I thought the solution would be to make a copy of them off of my computer and fill them out an mail them back. So I tried this and it copies the entire form except where they need my legal signature. What do I do? I need to get theses forms back to her soon.

Best answer:

Answer by Jackie
Just sign and date them at the bottom of the page. Explain if you need to.

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posted by shelly on Jun 28

Painter And Westfall LLC Attorneys At Law Video  | Legal Services in Hilliard

http://my.datasphere.com/biz/painter_and_westfall_llc_attorneys_law-legal_financial_lawyers_general_practice-hilliard_oh-12545942-127110 Nathan D. Painter an…
Video Rating: 5 / 5