posted by shelly on Feb 15

Some cool law firms images:

IRS Building
law firms

Image by afagen
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) building, Washington, DC

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Blogged by The Consumerist ("How To Rat Your Friends And Neighbors Out To The IRS" by Phil Villarreal – September 6, 2011) at consumerist.com/2011/09/how-to-rat-your-friends-and-neigh…

Blogged by Bargaineering ("How Does the IRS Pick Tax Returns to Audit?" by Jim Wang – March 29, 2011) at bargaineering.com/articles/how-does-the-irs-pick-tax-retu…

Blogged by The Consumerist ("IRS Says It’s Ready To Field Your E-Filings" by Phil Villarreal – January 20, 2012) at consumerist.com/2012/01/irs-says-its-ready-to-field-your-…

blogged by TaxMama.com ("IRA Penalty" – November 7, 2012) at taxmama.com/tax-quips/ira-penalty/

Used by Tax Whistleblower Law Firm ("Anonymous Whistleblower") at www.irstaxfraud.com/anonymous_whistleblower.html

Blogged by Roberg Tax Solutions ("Can You Lose Your Job if You Complain About the IRS?" by Jan Roberg – May 24, 2013) at robergtaxsolutions.com/2013/05/can-you-lose-your-job-if-y…

Blogged by 2009 Tax to 2013 Tax ("IRS PUBLICATION 17 FOR 2013" – June 20, 2013) at 2009tax.org/2013/06/20/irs-publication-17-for-2013/

Blogged by Financial Transparency Coalition ("Incentives, Economic Growth, And Distributional Effects Of Various Tax Expenditures" by Ann Hollingshead – February 14, 2013) at www.financialtransparency.org/2013/02/14/incentives-econo…

Blogged by DoctorDave Computer Repair in Lawrence Kansas ("It’s not just the NSA reading your email, it’s the IRS too" – November 3, 2013) at www.calldrdave.com/wp/2013/11/its-not-just-the-nsa-readin…

T C Walker House 1
law firms

Image by Universal Pops
[This T. C. Walker House set has four images, one being an historical marker] This is a creative commons image, which you may freely use by linking to this page. Please respect the photographer and his work.

The T. C. Walker House located in Gloucester Court House, Virginia, is now “mothballed” because of the poor condition of the structure. It was probably built sometime in the early 1880s as part of a small farm. It’s a 2-story wood frame vernacular structure, combining various elements of Greek Revival and Gothic Revival styles. It’s elevated on brick piers. The roof has three intersecting gables with a moderately-pitched roof. The porches were added in 1900 after Walker acquired the house. There are 25 original windows in the building. In the 1950s, Walker’s heirs covered the weatherboard exterior with asphalt siding, replaced the wood shingling with asphalt roofing and closed in the porches. Wiring and plumbing were also upgraded. The non-operational windmill for the well is steel and dates probably from the 1920s. In 1977 the house was donated to Hampton University.

Thomas Calhoun Walker (1862-1953) was born into slavery in Gloucester County. Despite his inability to read and write when he 13, he desired and education and struggled to achieve it, graduating from Hampton Institute (now Hampton University). He became the first black to practice law in the county. He was a school teacher, a lawyer, a member of the Board of Supervisors for the county, a politician; he received two presidential appointments, one from William McKinley as Collector of Customs for the Port of Tappahannock and the other from Franklin Roosevelt as WPA Advisor on Negro Affairs. In addition he was a lifelong advocate for the education of blacks. He was influential in establishing a high school for African-Americans in the county in the 1920s, persuading the Rosenwald Foundation and other organizations to assist in the costs of the enterprise. However, his interest in education extended much beyond the confines of Gloucester County. He was a firm believer that land ownership was a key economic freedom and a means of establishing one’s right as a member of a community. By 1940 90% of African-American farmers in Gloucester owned their own land.

His autobiography appeared posthumously in 1958—The Honey-Pod Tree: The Life Story of Thomas Calhoun Walker by Thomas Calhoun Walker and Florence L. Lattimore (1958)

The final nomination form for the National Register provides an extensive review of Walker’s life. This can be found at www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Counties/Gloucester/036-50…

The home was listed on the National Register of Historic Properties December 4, 2009 with reference ID #09001050—and is considered a work in progress.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

T C Walker House 2
law firms

Image by Universal Pops
[This T. C. Walker House set has four images, one being an historical marker] This is a creative commons image, which you may freely use by linking to this page. Please respect the photographer and his work.

The T. C. Walker House located in Gloucester Court House, Virginia, is now “mothballed” because of the poor condition of the structure. It was probably built sometime in the early 1880s as part of a small farm. It’s a 2-story wood frame vernacular structure, combining various elements of Greek Revival and Gothic Revival styles. It’s elevated on brick piers. The roof has three intersecting gables with a moderately-pitched roof. The porches were added in 1900 after Walker acquired the house. There are 25 original windows in the building. In the 1950s, Walker’s heirs covered the weatherboard exterior with asphalt siding, replaced the wood shingling with asphalt roofing and closed in the porches. Wiring and plumbing were also upgraded. The non-operational windmill for the well is steel and dates probably from the 1920s. In 1977 the house was donated to Hampton University.

Thomas Calhoun Walker (1862-1953) was born into slavery in Gloucester County. Despite his inability to read and write when he 13, he desired and education and struggled to achieve it, graduating from Hampton Institute (now Hampton University). He became the first black to practice law in the county. He was a school teacher, a lawyer, a member of the Board of Supervisors for the county, a politician; he received two presidential appointments, one from William McKinley as Collector of Customs for the Port of Tappahannock and the other from Franklin Roosevelt as WPA Advisor on Negro Affairs. In addition he was a lifelong advocate for the education of blacks. He was influential in establishing a high school for African-Americans in the county in the 1920s, persuading the Rosenwald Foundation and other organizations to assist in the costs of the enterprise. However, his interest in education extended much beyond the confines of Gloucester County. He was a firm believer that land ownership was a key economic freedom and a means of establishing one’s right as a member of a community. By 1940 90% of African-American farmers in Gloucester owned their own land.

His autobiography appeared posthumously in 1958—The Honey-Pod Tree: The Life Story of Thomas Calhoun Walker by Thomas Calhoun Walker and Florence L. Lattimore (1958)

The final nomination form for the National Register provides an extensive review of Walker’s life. This can be found at www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Counties/Gloucester/036-50…

The home was listed on the National Register of Historic Properties December 4, 2009 with reference ID #09001050—and is considered a work in progress.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

4 Comments to “Nice Law Firms photos”

  1. jroberg Says:

    Hi Adam, Thanks for posting in Creative Commons. I used this photo in a blog post about a local newscaster losing his job for saying he was targeted by the IRS. Here’s a link: robergtaxsolutions.com/2013/05/can-you-lose-your-job-if-y…
    Thanks again.

  2. freespirity115@yahoo.com Says:

    Did you ever notice when you put the 2,words the and IRS together it spells theirs…’

  3. Universal Pops Says:

    T C Walker House 4

  4. Universal Pops Says:

    T C Walker House 1

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